Posts Tagged ‘application’

track info pageExercise Tracker application with PhoneGap. In this tutorial, the Track Workout page and complete the app by creating the History and Track Info pages.
Saving the GPS Data

When the user clicks the Stop Tracking button, we need to stop following their GPS location and save all of the GPS points that were recorded (tracking_data) into the database. We’ll also reset the text input box (in case they want to record another workout straight away) and we’ll display a message that we have stopped location tracking.

PhoneGap provides both browser-based Local Storage and a SQLite database as methods of storing data on the phone. The SQL database is a lot more powerful (due to the fact you can specify table schemas), but comes at the cost of code complexity. Local Storage is a simple key/value store that is easy to setup and use. Data is stored using the setItem(key, value) method, and retrieved using the getItem(key) method.
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Hotkeys are keyboard shortcuts that save time and effort. A number of them are built into Windows as well as into various applications and they are the subject of many of the tips in this section. Windows also has a feature that makes it possible to assign your own custom hotkeys to an application, folder, or file so that it can be opened with a minimum of effort.

There are two ways for designating a hotkey in Windows. One uses a combination of two of the so-called modifier keys Ctrl, Alt, and Shift together with one other key. The other method uses a single key, one of function keys F1 to F12 or a key from the numeric pad. This second method uses keys that often have other functions and must be assigned with care to avoid conflicts.

The usual way to set up a hotkey is with the default combination “Ctrl + Alt + (key)” where (key) is another of the standard keyboard keys. Certain keys such as Esc, Ins, Del, Enter, Tab, Spacebar, PrtScn, Shift, or Backspace keys are not allowed as the third key but punctuation keys, arrow keys, Home, Page Down and others are allowed as well as the usual letters and numbers.

The Ctrl + Alt combination is automatically applied by Windows in the method given here but other combinations using two of the three modifier keys Ctrl, Alt, and Shift are also possible.

There is a small catch. Windows does not apply hotkeys to a file or folder directly but only works with a shortcut file for the desired target. For applications that are listed in All Programs, a shortcut file already exists. For other files or folders, a shortcut file for the object in question will have to be created if one does not already exist. The shortcut file must be placed in either the All Programs list or on the Desktop or a folder on the Desktop.

How to assign a hotkey to an application

  1. Open the Start menu
  2. Find the application in the All Programs menu
  3. Right-click the desired program file and choose “Properties”
  4. In the Properties dialog, find the text box labeled “Shortcut key
  5. Click in the text box and enter a key that you wish to use in your hotkey. Windows will automatically place “Ctrl + Alt +” in front. If you choose a function key or a numeric keypad key, only that key will be used and “Ctrl + Alt +” will not be added.
  6. Click “OK”

How to assign a hotkey to a folder or file not in the All Programs menu

  1. Create a shortcut file by right-click dragging the desired target file or folder to the Desktop (or to a folder on the Desktop) and choose “Create shortcuts here” from the right-click menu. (You can also use “Send to” but that will be covered in an upcoming tip.) You must create the shortcut exactly where you intend to keep it. If you create the shortcut one place and then move it, the hotkey won’t work,
  2. Right-click the new shortcut file and choose “Properties”
  3. Carry out steps 4-6 given above.

Scope of tip

I have used this tip on Windows XP, Vista, and 7. A comment below indicates that it also works in Windows 2000.

JavaScript variable =”<%=   there is your java code     %>”;

like …….

var companyId:<%=request.getParameter();%>

 

Web Services – Web Services Tutorials

Posted: January 12, 2012 in Random Posts
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In this section of the Web Services tutorial you will be familiarized with the Web Services.

Introduction

The next generation of distributed computing has arrived. A Web service is a unit of managed code that can be remotely invoked using HTTP, that is, it can be activated using HTTP requests.

Historically speaking, remote access to binary units required platform-specific and sometimes language-specific protocols. For example, DCOM clients access remote COM types using tightly coupled RPC calls. CORBA requires the use of tightly coupled protocol referred to as Internet Inter-ORB Protocol (IIOP), to activate remote types. Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs) requires a Remote Method Invocation (RMI) Protocol and by and large a specific language (Java). Thus each of these remote invocation architectures needs proprietary protocols, which typically require a tight connection to the remote source.

One can access Web services using nothing but HTTP. Of all the protocols in existence today, HTTP is the one specific wire protocol that all platforms tend to agree on. Thus , using Web services, a Web service developer can use any language he wish and a Web service consumer can use standard HTTP to invoke methods a Web service provides. The bottom line is that we have true language and platform integration . Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and XML are also two key pieces of the Web services architecture.

What is a Web Service

Web services constitute a distributed computer architecture made up of many different computers trying to communicate over the network to form one system. They consist of a set of standards that allow developers to implement distributed applications – using radically different tools provided by many different vendors – to create applications that use a combination of software modules called from systems in disparate departments or from other companies.

A Web service contains some number of classes, interfaces, enumerations and structures that provide black box functionality to remote clients. Web services typically define business objects that execute a unit of work (e.g., perform a calculation, read a data source, etc.) for the consumer and wait for the next request. Web service consumer does not necessarily need to be a browser-based client. Console-baed and Windows Forms-based clients can consume a Web service. In each case, the client indirectly interacts with the Web service through an intervening proxy. The proxy looks and feels like the real remote type and exposes the same set of methods. Under the hood, the proxy code really forwards the request to the Web service using standard HTTP or optionally SOAP messages.

Web Service Standards

Web services are registered and announced using the following services and protocols. Many of these and other standards are being worked out by the UDDI project, a group of industry leaders that is spearheading the early creation and design efforts.

Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) is a protocol for describing available Web services components. This standard allows businesses to register with an Internet directory that will help them advertise their services, so companies can find one another and conduct transactions over the Web. This registration and lookup task is done using XML and HTTP(S)-based mechanisms.

Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is a protocol for initiating conversations with a UDDI Service. SOAP makes object access simple by allowing applications to invoke object methods or functions, residing on remote servers. A SOAP application creates a request block in XML, supplying the data needed by the remote method as well as the location of the remote object itself.

Web Service Description Language (WSDL), the proposed standard for how a Web service is described, is an XML-based service IDL (Interface Definitition Language) that defines the service interface and its implementation characteristics. WSDL is referenced by UDDI entries and describes the SOAP messages that define a particular Web service.

ebXML (e-business XML) defines core components, business processes, registry and repository, messaging services, trading partner agreements, and security.

Implementing Web Services

Here comes a brief step-by-step on how a Web service is implemented.

  • A service provider creates a Web service
  • The service provider uses WSDL to describe the service to a UDDI registry
  • The service provider registers the service in a UDDI registry and/or ebXML registry/repository.
  • Another service or consumer locates and requests the registered service by querying UDDI and/or ebXML registries.
  • The requesting service or user writes an application to bind the registered service using SOAP in the case of UDDI and/or ebXML
  • Data and messages are exchanged as XML over HTTP

Web Service Infrastructure

Even though Web services are being built using existing infrastructure, there exists a strong necessity for a number of innovative infrastructures. The core architectural foundation of Web services are XML, XML namespaces, and XML schema. UDDI, SOAP, WSDL, ebXML and security standards are being developed in parallel by different vendors

Web Services Technologies and Tools

There are a number of mechanisms for constructing Web services. Microsoft has come out with a new object-oriented language C# as the development language for Web services and .NET framework. Microsoft has an exciting tool called Visual Studio .NET in this regard. The back end database can be Microsoft SQL Server 2000 in Windows 2000 Professional.

Sun Microsystems has its own set of technologies and tools for facilitating Web services development. Java Servlets, Java Server Pages (JSPs), Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) architecture and other Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) technologies play a very critical role in developing Web services.

There are a number of tools for developing Web services. They are Forte Java IDE, Oracle JDeveloper, and WebGain Studio.

Sun Microsystems has taken an initiative called Sun ONE (Open Network Environment) and is planning to push Java forward as a platform for Web services. It is developing Java APIs for XML-based remote procedure calls and for looking up services in XML registries – two more JAX family APIs: JAX/RPC (Java API for XML Remote Procedure Calls) and JAXR (Java API for XML Registries). These will wrap up implementations of Web services standards, such as SOAP and UDDI.

IBM also for its part has already developed a suite of early-access tools for Web services development. They are Web Services Toolkit (WSTK), WSDL Toolkit, and Web Services Development Environment (WSDE).

Apache Axis is an implementation of the SOAP (“Simple Object Access Protocol”) submission to W3C.

From the draft W3C specification:

SOAP is a lightweight protocol for exchanging structured information in a decentralized, distributed environment. It is an XML based protocol that consists of three parts: an envelope that defines a framework for describing what is in a message and how to process it, a set of encoding rules for expressing instances of application-defined datatypes, and a convention for representing remote procedure calls and responses.

Apache Axis is an Open Source SOAP server and client. SOAP is a mechanism for inter-application communication between systems written in arbitrary languages, across the Internet. SOAP usually exchanges messages over HTTP: the client POSTs a SOAP request, and receives either an HTTP success code and a SOAP response or an HTTP error code. Open Source means that you get the source, but that there is no formal support organization to help you when things go wrong.

Conclusion

For the last few years, XML has enabled heterogeneous computing environments to share information over the Web. It now offers a simplified means by which to share process as well. From a technical perspective, the advent of Web services is not a revolution in distributed computing. It is instead a natural evolution of XML application from structured representation of information to structured representation of inter-application messaging.

Prior to the advent of Web services, enterprise application integration (EAI) was very difficult due to differences in programming languages and middleware used within organizations. This led to the situation where interoperability was cumbersome and painful. With the arrival of Web services, any application can be integrated as long as it is Internet-enabled.

It is difficult to avoid the popularity and hype that is surrounding Web services. Each software vendor has some initiative concerning Web services and there is always great speculation about the future of the market for them. Whichever way it turns out, Web service architectures provide a very different way of thinking about software development. From client-server to n-tier systems, to distributed computing, Web service applications represent the culmination of each of these architectures in combination with the Internet.

·

Introduction

 

In
this tutorial we will create a simple web service and a client web application
using eclipse IDE along with
Lomboz
plug
in.
We
will also deploy and test the web service on Tomcat 5.5.4 web application
server. This application, while simple, provides a good introduction to Web
service development and some of the Web development tools available.

 

·
Environment

 

J2SDK
1.4.2

http://java.sun.com/

 

Eclipse
3.1

 

http://www.eclipse.org/

 

 

Tomcat
5.5.4

 

http://tomcat.apache.org/

 

 

Lomboz
3.1RC2

http://lomboz.objectweb.org/

 

 

 

·
Installation

 

Install
JDK (in D:\j2sdk1.4.2_04)

 

Install
Tomcat (in E:\Tomcat5.5)

 

Install
Eclipse (in E:\Eclipse3.1)

 

Install
Lomboz (in E:\Eclipse3.1)

 

·
Setting up

 

  1. Set
    up the installed JRE in eclipse (Windows -> Preferences -> Java ->
    Installed JREs)
     

 

 

  1. Set
    up the installed runtime for server in eclipse (Windows -> Preferences
    -> Server -> Installed Runtimes)
     

 

 

  1. Set
    up the Server view in eclipse (Windows -> Show View -> Other)
     

 


 

 

  1. Set
    up the Tomcat Server by right clicking and selecting New -> Server option
    from the Server view in eclipse
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

·
Creating a Web service

 

  1. Create
    a new Dynamic Web Project in eclipse (File -> New -> Other)
     

 

 

 

  1. Enter
    name as ?WebServiceTutorial?, select project location as ?E:\Test?
    and select Apache Tomcat v5.5 as the Target server.
     

 

 

 

  1. Now
    create a new Java class from the Project Explorer (Dynamic Web Projects
    -> Java Source -> New -> Class)
     

 

 

 

  1. Enter
    name as ?Hello? and package as ?com.tutorial?.
     

 

 

  1. Add
    a simple method in the ?Hello? class as below.
     


public String sayHello(String name){

 


return “Hello ” + name;

 


}

 


 

 

  1. Save
    and build the project.
     
  2. Create
    a new Web service in eclipse (File -> New -> Other)
     

 

 

  1. Select
    Generate a proxy.
     
  2. Select
    Test the Web service.
     
  3. Select
    Overwrite files without warning.
     

 

 

  1. Select
    or enter the Bean name as ?com.tutorial.Hello?. This is the java class
    that we just now created.
     

 

 

  1. Continue
    the wizard by clicking Next and finish.
     
  2. On
    Finish, the Tomcat server starts up and launches the Test client.
     
  3. Verify
    the generated contents. Look for Hello.class and the generated JSPs as
    below.
     

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Verify
    the Tomcat folder and ensure the newly created web applications ?
    WebServiceTutorial, WebServiceTutorialClient.
     

 

 

 

 

  1. We
    can also run the following url from the browser to access/test the Web
    service.
     

http://localhost:8080/WebServiceTutorialClient/sampleHelloProxy/TestClient.jsp

 

 

  1. If
    servlet error ?org.eclipse.jst.ws.util.JspUtils cannot be resolved or is
    not a type? is thrown on the browser, then copy the webserviceutils.jar
    file from the E:\Eclipse3.1\eclipse\plugins\org.eclipse.jst.ws.consumption_0.7.0
    into the WEB-INF\lib folder of the WebServiceTutorialClient application and
    restart the Tomcat server.
     
  1. The
    browser displays the methods available in the web service.
     

 

 

 

  1. Click
    on the sayHello(..) method, enter your name (for e.g. ?Jeeva?) in
    the inputs section and click ?Invoke?.
     

 

 

 

  1. The
    browser greets using the web service.
     

 

 

 

 

 

  1. The
    WSDL for the Hello Web service can be found in E:\Test\WebServiceTutorial\WebContent\wsdl\Hello.wsdl.
    On double-click, the WSDL opens in a graphical editor.
     

 

 

 

  1. Right-click
    on the WSDL file and explore the options to test the web service / publish
    the WSDL file / generate client / etc.
     

 

 

 

 

·
Conclusion

 

In this
tutorial we learned how to create a simple web service and a client web
application using eclipse IDE along with
Lomboz
plug
in.
We
also deployed and tested the web service on Tomcat 5.5.4 web application server.
This application, while simple, provides a good introduction to Web service
development and some of the Web development tools available.

Reference # http://www.roseindia.net/webservices/buildingsimplewebservice.shtml